The beginning of October brought us the Conservative Party conference and a plethora of promises and fiery speeches. Meanwhile world stock markets were tumbling on fears of a global sell-off and the US/Europe tariff war joining the US/China dispute. By the middle of the month President Trump declared himself ‘optimistic’ about trade talks with China. Come the end of October it looked like the World Trade Organisation (WTO) would allow China to impose tariffs on $3.6bn (£2.8bn) of US goods, a move that was confirmed in very early November. Boris Johnson spent the early part of the month trying to Read More

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October has not been a good month for fund managers (the people who make the investment decisions that dictate how well your savings and investments perform). There have been two very high profile resignations – one as a result of a Sunday Times investigation, the other from a Panorama exposé. Unsurprisingly, clients have been asking us questions, so we decided to write this short article outlining what has happened and, more importantly, dealing with any worries clients may have. The Downfall of Neil Woodford There cannot be anyone in the financial services industry who has not heard of Neil Woodford. Read More

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As pressure mounts on governments and financial institutions to do more to combat climate change, the demand for ethical investment opportunities is on the rise. Triodos Bank’s annual impact investing survey has found that nearly half (45%) of investors say that they would be keen to move their money to an ethical fund as a result of news surrounding the environment. When asked, investors state that they would put an average of £3,744 into an impact investment fund, marking an increase of £1,000 when compared with 2018. 53% of respondents believe that responsible investment is one of the best ways Read More

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If you’ve got a son or daughter at college or university, you could have some stark financial lessons ahead. Getting the grades may have dominated the household up to now but budgeting for their life as a student can require just as much focus. Tuition fees and student loans are usually top of the agenda. Most universities charge £9,250 for tuition fees but the financial help available to students for their living costs will differ. Maintenance loans are calculated according to where the student is going to study, where they plan to live and how much their parents earn. As Read More

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